On cold winter nights, Michelle Williams sneaks out of her 1947 home, through the yard and into the stable where her pack of alpacas lives. She notes the hay strewn about, remembering Jesus was born in a similar location some 2,000 years ago. 

She sings “Silent Night” to the animals, marveling at God’s creation. 

“Whenever you think of God’s creatures, the connection is just a tranquility,” Michelle said. “They remind me of the manger, the little Jesus in the manger.”

Mission Trip Tchotchke

Michelle’s fascination with alpacas started when her husband, Bob, came home from a medical mission trip to Peru with a stuffed animal alpaca. That was the spark — Michelle didn’t know anything about alpacas before that — but her interest wouldn’t come to fruition until a few years later. 

Michelle and Bob bought their home to raise a family, but after the kids were grown, Michelle wanted a new hobby. She thought back to that little stuffed alpaca and decided to go all in. She bought a pack. 

“I wanted something to take care of again,” Michelle said. “We did the research. We looked at goats. We looked at getting another horse or something, but after my husband had come back from Peru, I was always fascinated with alpacas because of the pictures that he brought home.” 

You can’t just buy one alpaca — they like to be in groups — so she started out with six. 

Bob and Michelle keep their infant granddaughter, Mia, some days, and the alpacas love her. Of course, Mia loves them as well. She will grow up having some excellent stories about her grandparents babysitting her on an alpaca farm.

“They’re very gentle animals,” Michelle said. “They’re very curious animals. They’re very majestic. … They’re just very calming. They’re beautiful.”

Giving Back 

Since their home sits on a fairly well-traveled road, people often backed up traffic by driving slow to see the animals. There was clearly an interest in them, so Michelle decided to open the farm up to outsiders. These days, she schedules small tours to cheer people up in the midst of the coronavirus outbreak. 

Many still feel hesitant about indoor entertainment, so the alpaca farm provides a little relief and excitement while maintaining social distancing standards. 

“I do it more for (the kids) because I love the smiles that they bring,” Michelle said. 

On cold winter nights, Michelle Williams sneaks out of her 1947 home, through the yard and into the stable where her pack of alpacas lives. She notes the hay strewn about, remembering Jesus was born in a similar location some 2,000 years ago. 

She sings “Silent Night” to the animals, marveling at God’s creation. 

“Whenever you think of God’s creatures, the connection is just a tranquility,” Michelle said. “They remind me of the manger, the little Jesus in the manger.”

Mission Trip Tchotchke

Michelle’s fascination with alpacas started when her husband, Bob, came home from a medical mission trip to Peru with a stuffed animal alpaca. That was the spark — Michelle didn’t know anything about alpacas before that — but her interest wouldn’t come to fruition until a few years later. 

Michelle and Bob bought their home to raise a family, but after the kids were grown, Michelle wanted a new hobby. She thought back to that little stuffed alpaca and decided to go all in. She bought a pack. 

“I wanted something to take care of again,” Michelle said. “We did the research. We looked at goats. We looked at getting another horse or something, but after my husband had come back from Peru, I was always fascinated with alpacas because of the pictures that he brought home.” 

You can’t just buy one alpaca — they like to be in groups — so she started out with six. 

Bob and Michelle keep their infant granddaughter, Mia, some days, and the alpacas love her. Of course, Mia loves them as well. She will grow up having some excellent stories about her grandparents babysitting her on an alpaca farm.

“They’re very gentle animals,” Michelle said. “They’re very curious animals. They’re very majestic. … They’re just very calming. They’re beautiful.”

Giving Back 

Since their home sits on a fairly well-traveled road, people often backed up traffic by driving slow to see the animals. There was clearly an interest in them, so Michelle decided to open the farm up to outsiders. These days, she schedules small tours to cheer people up in the midst of the coronavirus outbreak. 

Many still feel hesitant about indoor entertainment, so the alpaca farm provides a little relief and excitement while maintaining social distancing standards. 

“I do it more for (the kids) because I love the smiles that they bring,” Michelle said. 

While we’re not sure if there was an alpaca in the stable where Jesus was born, it’s evident they’re helping show the love of Christ to others during stressful times.